Animals | Nature

Beautiful Painted Buntings Are Colorful Birds That Perfectly Live Up To Their Name

Nature has so many hidden beauties, and it keeps surprising us every day. There are so many beautiful things out there, and now is the real time to go out for an adventure. Go out and enjoy the greatest beauties in this world.

Have you ever seen the Painted Bunting bird? It belongs to the Cardinalidae birds and the cardinal family. These birds live in South America and Mexico, and they are really beautiful.

The birds are the perfect combination of red, yellow, green and blue. It’s interesting to note that these birds are shy. You can see them in roadsides, gardens, woodland edges and hedgerows.

The cute birds live in dense bushes, and that’s where they get their seeds from. You can’t really see them because they hide all the time. How to attract these beauties? Place a feeder on the ground, preferably near the bushes. The Painted Bunting bird prefers seeds from native grasses.

During the breeding season, the colorful birds can be seen in Arizona, Louisiana, Texas, and Oklahoma. In winter, the birds fly all the way to Mexico.

Male birds defend their territory especially when it’s under a threat during the breeding season. They sing from a higher point to warn other males. Yes, they even get into a physical fight.

In French, the name of these birds means “without equal.” Sometimes people call them “Nonpareil.” The male is actually the most gorgeous bird I North America. Unfortunately, their umber has seen a decline.

“Our goal is to see if there is some sort of broadly consistent pattern that relates the populations that are declining to where most spend the winter,” says Rushing, an assistant professor of wildland resources at Utah State University.

“It’s a way to at least generate hypotheses. If we saw that declining populations were more likely to spend winters in Cuba and stable populations are going to South Florida, that might be suggestive of whether there are problems in Cuba.”

Sources:
www.allaboutbirds.org
en.wikipedia.org
www.audubon.org